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MANUKAU MODEL POWER BOAT CLUB Inc

 

Web Sites:

HTTP://homepages.paradise.net.nz/nickbree/mmpbc/

Venue: Wattle Farm Rd Pond Manurewa

2nd & 4th Sunday of each month

 

Secretary:        Glen Sayers                 Editor   Chris Breen

                        9 Reyland Close                       86 Chivalry Rd

                        Manurewa                               Glenfield

                        Ph 267 2607                              Ph 4445 482                              February 2002

 

HOT NEWS (Yet Again)

SEAFAIR TROPHY 9th & 10th February 2002

Venue: Wattle Farm Ponds at Manurewa Auckland

Reminder to send in your entry to Steve Trott 50 Gravatt Rd Royal Palm Beach Papamoa ASAP.

We also need all MMPBC members and friends to assist with set-up both days. Please get to the pond by 7.30 am.

TECH NOTES

Some extracts from the RCBOAT.COM Listbot, for those brave souls with more money than sense, - but it is interesting to read what is going on in the US.

Piston Modifications

This is what I do on all my engines.

The top of the cut is even with the top of the side transfer port at the point that the exhaust port just starts to open. I time the exhaust, BEFORE I make the cut on the piston. The rear of the piston is skirted even with the bottom of the liner at BDC. This is a secret, so don't tell anyone. Works for me....

 

CAUTIONS: :

A few cautions if you decide to do this. Use only a very sharp 1/8" carbide end mill and cut very slowly. The rounded corners are super important. Don't get the piston hot. Be sure to do measurements so that you don't expose any of the side of the exhaust window - the engine will not run well that way. The more taper the liner has the quicker the piston will wear out. The piston rocks more without some of the skirt. Be sure to deburr the inside and outside of the cut piston super well - this can scratch the liner so that it is not good. If this hasn't scared you off, the gains will be that you will have a smoother engine and more performance at the slight expense of piston life.

Marty Davis (USA)

Prop Heat Treating

If you have access to a temperature controlled oven, you can perfectly heat treat your props. McMaster-Carr has .002" soft stainless bags that are part number 3438K11 price $17.17 (10 qty) which you place your props in, drop in a wooden kitchen match (to burn up the oxygen when it get hot enough)and place in the heat treat furnace. Temperatures are: 1100 degrees for 1 hour, quench (if you have the nerve, urine is best, if not then icewater), place back in the furnace for 1 hour at 600 degrees, turn off oven and allow to air cool. The prop should NOT be tarnished at all and will be HARD. This makes props hold their edge very well. McMaster-Carr has a website http://www.mcmaster.com/

 

The finishing touch is to spray your prop with Dykem, to see where the prop bites, and were there are areas that do nothing (you can remove them). After running your props for a while with the Dykem (red) on them you can see all these areas (Dykem will be rubbed off by the water, in these areas). Part number for the Dykem is 2131A64 price $7.72

Marty Davis (USA) Editor’s note: NOT applicable to stainless steel props I believe.

Tuned Pipe Calculator

The following link is of interest to those wishing to design & fabricate their own tuned pipes

http://beadec1.ea.bs.dlr.de/airfoils/tpipedes.html

Add-on Muffler for NZ conditions

Below is a diagram for silencing tuned pipes which has used successfully over the last 20 odd yrs.

Some further Good Advice

Extracts from http://intlwaters.com/ discussion board

I am amazed when I watch some of the starts at our races. There are people who have been racing for several years that do not know how to get on the clock. With a few days practice, anyone should be able to be within 30 to 40 feet of the start when the clock expires. With a little more practice this distance should be brought down to a maximum of 15 feet.

Things that help me:

1. Get in the water as soon as possible so you will have time to set up on the clock. Getting in early also gives you time to observe the other drivers and to estimate how they are going to run the last lap or so of mill time.

2. When you practice your golf shots, you hit different clubs until you know the distance you can hit each club. You should practice with your boat until you know how long it will take to get from point A to point B. Know how long it takes you to run a lap at full speed, half speed, etc. How long from the back straight center to the start, from buoy 4 to the start. I use the back straight more than the front to set up for the clock. Running at about half speed, you should know when you need to be at back center on the last lap of mill time. If you are off you can speed up, slow down or go long.

3. Study each course that you race on and figure where you can go long or wide to spill off time. Study markers such as docks, trees, etc. around the portion of the pond that you plan to lose time and check your time at half and full speed from these markers to the start line.

4. DON'T RACE during pit time and mill time. This is not the time to see who you can outrun. Use the time to set up for the start and to observe the other boats. Are they wild, steady, fast, slow, on the start or way off??

5. If you are using the floating clock, have your pit man call the last 10, 7.5, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 seconds out to you. Have him talk close to your left ear as he watches the clock. Make sure he can count it down correctly. Do not listen to the guy on the mike or other pit men, at times they are a second or so off. REMEMBER -- The race starts at 0 not 1.

6. As you approach buoy 6 things get pretty wild. Listen to the time from your pit man and watch the other boats. If you are not in the inside lane and in the lead, the best place is probably lane 4 or 5. If you are not going into turn one in the lead, it is better to be a bit wide as several boats may spin out or run over each other in the first turn. There is plenty of racing time after the first turn.

7. When six or so boats make their run at the start, things get pretty harry and the best of plans sometimes go out the window, but if you practice the start, and know the speed of your boat, it becomes somewhat automatic and it will become much easier to come out of turn one in a good position to win the race.

Rip Holdridge

1. After a heat or before the first heat, I wipe down my boat, pull the plug ( I always use a new plug for each heat, save the used ones for testing) and make needle valve adjustments if necessary.

2. I fill the tanks, apply starter and choke fuel into the engine. Blow out the fuel until it is a fine mist. To prevent a good squirt in the eye, place your hand over the head of the engine. I like to use my hand and not a rag because I can feel it when it begins to mist.

3. Disconnect the fuel line or pinch off so fuel expansion will not flood the motor. If I can get to the fuel line, I pull it off engine. If you pinch off the line, sooner or later you will pinch a hole in the line and cost yourself a heat.

4. Check a new plug with glow starter and install. Put the boat aside until your next heat comes up.

5. When your heat comes up, move into the pits, pick up radio clip and radio. Get ready to start as soon as possible. Decide with your pit man who will apply glow starter, start motor, install cowl, etc before the pit time starts.

6. Use a 24 volt starter. This one item will save you more "no starts" than any other item. A 24 volt starter is also easier on your equipment as you do not have to engage the starter and jerk up on the belt to get the motor to turn. You also do not have to loosen the plug which gradually eats out the threads in the head button. If you have completed step 2 & 3 you don't have to worry about hydraulic damage.

7. Hook up fuel line and apply plug heater and starter. The fuel mist from item 2 is now a vapor and your engine starts immediately. I carry enough fuel to be able to start immediately. This gives you more mill time to adjust 3rd. channel and to get set up for the start. (Third channel needle is mandatory!!)

8. Train your pit man to check for your nod and to launch the boat correctly. He should look at you for your ok and check with pit boss before launching. If you are my pit man, you are going to get your feet wet. Trying to toss a boat in the water without getting the $100 tennies wet won't get it. I see many guys launch a boat from a standing position from about four feet in the air. Not only do you have a very good chance of not getting a flat launch but do you realize how much shock it passed to the boat hull. Gel coat stress cracks are a certainty.

9. I prop my boats and set pipe length so they do not require a mighty heave to get them up and on plane. Hey guys this is heat racing not straight away time trials. Its not who runs the fastest but who runs fast and finishes every heat. Running the fastest comes later after you learn to get in the water, on the clock and finish every heat, every time.

Ok you are now in the water. The above steps are very easy, even for new boaters and will save you many headaches and "no starts". Get these simple things down right and you will have to build a new trophy shelf.

Now check out my previous article on “How To Get On The Clock.”

Rip Holdridge Dallas, TX

Notes from Race day on Sunday January 13th

Yet again the day was excellent after a very unpromising Saturday. The day’s highlight was the two Enduro races for which the Burns family very kindly donated two bottles of wine as prizes. Well done Adrian and Malcolm.

Offshore Sprints.

Name

Preceeding Points Total

Heat 1

Heat 2

Heat3

Heat 4

Heat 5

Heat 6

Total for the day

New Points Total

Wayne

   

8

8

     

16

 

Graham

 

8

   

9

   

17

 

Jason

 

9

 

9

     

18

 

Adrian

 

10

   

10

   

20

 

Malcolm

   

10

 

8

   

18

 

Peter

     

DNF*

         

Chris

   

9

10

     

19

 

Brian

   

DNS

 

DNF

       

Enduro Points

Name

Preceeding Points Total

Race 1

Race 2

Race3

Total for the day

New Points Total

Graham

 

9

**

 

9

 

Wayne

 

7

   

7

 

Adrian

 

10

**

 

10

 

Malcolm

   

10

 

10

 

Brett

 

6

   

6

 

Peter

 

8

   

8

 

Chris

   

9

 

9

 

Brian

           

** = ran in race 2 but not a points entry

Hydros

Name

Preceeding Points Total

Heat 1

Heat 2

Heat3

Heat 4

Heat 5

Heat 6

Total for the day

New Points Total

Jason

 

9

10

DNS

10

   

29

 

Merv

 

DNF*

DNS

DNS

DNS

       

Chris

 

10

DNS

10

DNF*

   

20

 

* = $5 fee for hitting buoy (Chris, Merv, Peter) – Editor’s note: This was a GOOD idea

Programme

The programme for each Race Day (2nd Sunday of the Month) meeting will run something like the following:

Note: No boats on the water until after Drivers-Brief and boat has been scrutineered, & DAY FEE $3 paid.

09.00 - 9.30am Set-up course

09.30 - 10.00 Boat scrutineering

10.00 –10.15 Drivers Briefing (It is important that everyone is at the briefing! No Brief – No Race)

10.15 – 10.30 Open Water Class 1&2

10.30 –11.00 Class 1 & 2 Sprint Racing

11.00 – 11.15 Open Water Hydro

11.15 –11.45 Hydro Racing 1/8th and or Sport 45 / Tunnels (NO Cats)

11.45-12.15 Class 1 & 2 Racing Enduro

12.15-12.30 LUNCH

12.30-1.00 Hydro Racing 1/8th and or Sport 45 / Tunnels (NO Cats)

1.00-1.30 Class 1 & 2 Sprint Racing

2.00-3.00 Hydro Racing 1/8th and or Sport 45 / Tunnels (NO Cats) FINAL TAKE ALL

3.00-3.30 Class 1 & 2 Enduro Racing DOUBLE POINTS

4.00 Clean up……..

List of Competitors, frequencies and boats

Will appear again next issue

Club Points Standings

(Editor’s Note: Previous errors corrected, no further correspondence will be entered into)

Driver

Boat

Total Enduro Points)

Total Sprint Points

 

Class I Off-Shore

   

Graham Doggett

Ohio Steel

206

42

Peter Wright

Obsession

129

47

Adrian Milanesi

Orange &white thingi

136

 

Adrian Milanesi

Lamborghini

126

48

Glen Sayers

Blue thingi

47

30

Wayne Lester

Bud Dry

40

34

Jason Lester

Coca Cola

94

27

Tony Webster

Martini Racing

 

17

Tony Belle

Blue & White sprint

179

70

Malcolm Miller

Skulduggery

326

72

Adrienne Kockott

Evoluzione

18

 

Tony Kockott

Tornado

18

8

Brian Nesbitt

Pussycat

205

17

Phil Leach

 

80

70

Russell Day

 

58

 

Jeremy & Brett) Harrison

 

36

43

Chris Breen

Lemon & Paeroa

96

75

 

Class II Off-Shore

   

Glen Sayers

Steves Model shop

26

 

Jason Lester

DeWalt

46

36

Malcolm Miller

Red Boat

49

 

Graham Doggett

   

8

Warrick Kockott

Coke

 

10

 

Hydros

   

Glen Sayers

York

 

10

Chris Breen

Black Fire

 

59

Chris Breen

Llumar

 

29

Jason Lester

Poisidon

 

29

Jason Lester

DeWalt

 

28

Merv Sowden

Radical Rat

 

29

Merv Sowden

Miss Bud

 

10

Advertisement

A potential new member, Kevin Anderson is possibly still keen to buy his first boat. If you have one for sale give Kevin a ring:

534 7970

4 Wood Ave

Howick

NZMPBA Membership

All MMPBC members are recommended to also join the NZMPBA. Membership is expected for those attending the various nationally sanctioned regattas.

According to the secretary G Haines, subs are due from January 1st 2002 and are still $30 till the AGM, then they may go up. Those who pay their subs early will get them at the existing rates and will not be asked to pay the extra if they go up.  Send your money, contact details, boat details etc etc to :

Graham Haines

130 Maxwell Rd

Blenheim

Ph fax 03 577 5124, Mob 021 252 3802, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The venue for the AGM is the same as the last few years, namely at Highbury Primary School in Palmerston North on Sat 23 February. We will kick off at 10.00am with a cup of coffee and start the meeting at 10.30.

We will be running a buy sell or swap table at the AGM so if you have anything that you no longer wish to own, bring it along and see if someone else can find a use for it.

Well that is all for this newsletter people – Next Club Race Day is SEAFAIR, February 9th & 10th !!!.

C Breen – Editor

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